10 PRODUCTS LINKED TO CANCER THAT ARE HIDING IN ALMOST EVERY HOME

I have healthy alternatives for numbers 1, 5, 6, 7, 8 & 9!

Do you ever walk through someone’s home and take note of items that could potentially be hazardous to their health? I know I do! I don’t mean to judge, but I can’t help but notice when people have fluoride-filled toothpaste sitting on their bathroom counters or chemical-ridden cleaners hiding in their cabinets. But, what if some of these items are sitting in your own home?

Most people have toxic products linked to cancer in every corner of their homes, often without even realizing it. It’s not like the labels of these products all have a huge warning sign that reads, “I can cause cancer!”

Nevertheless, whether people knowingly purchase these cancer-causing products or not, we need to educate one another on their potential harmful effects.

The following list highlights some of the most popular products found in North American homes that are linked to cancer:

1. Shampoo
One of the most common items hiding in most people’s homes are chemical-ridden hair products, particularly shampoos and conditioners. Some of the typical chemicals within conventional shampoos include sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), parfum/fragrance, parabens, synthetic colours, and more.

2. Non-Stick Cookware
When I first discovered non-stick cookware, I absolutely loved it! That was, until I found out about the potential health risks that come with cooking with these products. The issue is that non-stick cookware is created using a synthetic coating of polytetrafluoroethylene, otherwise known as Teflon, a plastic polymer that will actually release toxins when heated at 450 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.

3. Artificial Sweeteners
Artificial sweeteners are in so many products, and one of the most prevalent ones used is aspartame. Aspartame is commonly thought to only be in diet sodas, but it’s often added to teas, energy drinks, protein shakes, milk products, juices, and other artificially flavoured beverages. Aspartame has been linked to numerous health problems, including cancer.

4. Plastic Bottles and Food Containers
So much of our “food” comes in plastic bags, containers, and bottles. Even our fruits and vegetables are commonly wrapped in plastic. Not only is this extremely wasteful and bad for the environment, but it isn’t very good for our health, either.

5. Air Fresheners
This is a big one. Air fresheners are all over people’s houses; from bedrooms to bathrooms to cars, people love them. Typically they’re made with synthetic fragrance, otherwise known as parfum. Parfum is basically a cocktail of toxic chemicals, but instead of listing all of these chemicals on the back of products, it’s conveniently labelled as “parfum” so that companies can keep their signature fragrance a trade secret.

6. Conventional Cleaners
Most families have an entire shelf filled with toxic cleaners because corporations convince consumers they need different products to clean specific surfaces. Even though most of these products have toxic warning signs on them that clearly state they’re poisonous and/or corrosive, people continue to, quite literally, buy into this corporate propaganda. Not only are they breathing in these fumes while cleaning, but so are any of their household visitors and/or children.

7. Toothpaste
Commercial toothpastes primarily use toxic substances as a means to “clean your mouth,” as the ingredients in regular toothpastes can cause enamel damage, dental flourosis, stomach ailments, skin rashes, and more.

8. Soap
Whether it’s dish soap, hand soap, or body wash, conventional soaps often contain a wide array of chemicals. Antibacterial soaps regularly contain Triclosan, which is a potential carcinogen, along with many of the other ingredients often found in typical soaps. Conventional soaps also often contain parfum/fragrance.

9. Laundry Detergent
Laundry detergents often contain phosphorus, enzymes, ammonia, naphthalene, phenol, and sodium nitilotriacetate, all of which can cause rashes, itchiness, dryness, and sinus problems. These chemicals are easily absorbed through your skin from your clothes and bed sheets. In addition, many conventional detergents contain artificial scents and “fragrance,” which is a code name for a sweet cocktail of hazardous chemicals and potential carcinogens.

10. Baby Powder
Many baby powders are talc-based, meaning that they contain high amounts of talcum powder. According to the American Cancer Society, talc in its natural form, which contains asbestos, can cause cancer. One of the most popular baby powders used produced by Johnson and Johnson is talc-based. The company has been sued many times and has paid millions of dollars to those who claimed their baby powder caused their cancer.
— http://www.unseen-pedia.com/10-products-linked-cancer-hiding-almost-every-home/

Study Links Childhood Cancer and In-Home Pesticide Use

Pesticides

are in too many products!

A study by Harvard researchers provides disturbing evidence that children’s exposure to household insecticides is linked to higher risks of childhood leukemia and lymphoma, the most common cancers in children. The analysis also found an association between use of outdoor herbicides to lawns and gardens and higher risks of leukemia.

“It is very troubling, albeit not surprising, to see additional scientific evidence linking pesticide use to childhood cancer,” said Ken Cook, EWG president and co-founder. “The findings confirm parents’ worst fears that they could be unknowingly exposing their children to harmful chemicals that can lead to serious, even life-threatening, illnesses.”

“This study should remind us once again that we must protect our kids by curtailing our use of these toxic chemicals in and outside of the home,” Cook added.

The results from a meta-analysis, to be published in the journal Pediatrics in October, combined 16 studies reporting children’s exposure to pesticides used in and around the home. As the authors noted, children are more vulnerable to harmful pesticides because their bodies and immune systems are still developing. The researchers added that infants and toddlers are at especially high risk of exposure because they often play on pesticide-treated lawns or on carpets or floors where pesticide residues accumulate, and then put their hands and fingers in their mouths.

“Parents should consider the danger of pesticides in terms of the lethal toxicity of any products and the proximity to where your children play, eat, rest and sleep,” said Dr. Alex Lu, a Harvard Chan School of Public Health associate professor and senior author of the study. “This is also true for schools, playgrounds and sports fields.”

Lu added, “There is no justification for using chemical pesticides to maintain buildings, play areas or sport fields. There are plenty of non-chemical based treatments that will serve the purpose.”

EWG advises parents to stop using lawn and garden care, and to use indoor pesticides only as a last resort. See Healthy Child Healthy World’s greener tips on how to control indoor pests and how to protect your pets from fleas and ticks.

Another major source of children’s exposure to pesticides is food. Conventionally grown fruits and vegetables often carry multiple pesticide residues even after they have been washed, and in some cases, peeled. That’s why EWG updates its Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ every year in order to help shoppers figure out which are the “dirtiest,” or most contaminated, and which are the “cleanest,” or least contaminated. The guide encourages shoppers to opt for organic versions of the “dirtiest” fruits and vegetables.

As Lu explains in this video, switching to an organic diet can significantly lower a child’s exposure to pesticides.

The American Academy of Pediatrics cites EWG’s Shopper’s Guide as a reliable resource for parents looking to reduce their children’s exposures.
— http://www.ewg.org/release/study-links-childhood-cancer-and-home-pesticide-use#.WZT4x62ZN-h

Razors with moisturizing strip are proven to produce toxicity and cancer

Most “quality” razors these days have a moisturizing strip. This is a great feature, but there can be a big downside to how they affect your body.

Because we don’t digest razors we tend not to pay attention to the ingredients on the label, however, razors that have several chemical ingredients (that you can’t pronounce to save your life) are the ones to be weary about.

Some even contain ingredients linked to allergies, cancer, and organ toxicity. If you get rashes or razor burn when using them, you might be having an allergic reaction. Here are the ingredients to a popular razor with a moisturizing strip:

Ingredients: Sodium Palmitate, Sodium Cocoate, Sodium Isostearate, Water, Potassium Palmitate, Glycerin, Sodium Isostearoyl Lactylate, Potassium Cocoate, Kaolin, Potassium Isostearate, Sucrose Cocoate, Titanium Dioxide, Peg-50 Shea Butter, Sodium Chloride, Tocopheryl Acetate, Tetrasodium Etidronate, Pentasodium Pentetate, Punica Granatum Fruit Extract, Butylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Red 33, Fragrance.

Let’s look at a few of those.

Tocopheryl Acetate – Strong evidence that it’s a skin toxicant or allergen. Small concern that it is linked to cancer. Source.
Titanium Dioxide: Moderate concern for cancer, organ system toxicity, and classified as toxic or harmful by the Enviornment Canada Domestic Substance List. Source.
Phenoxyethanol: A preservative that is restricted in Japan and classified as an irritant by the European Union. Source.
Fragrance: This is the biggest offender. Fragrance on an ingredient list refers to an “undisclosed mixture of various scent chemicals.” These mixtures are linked to all kinds of things including allergies, dermatitis, and respiratory distress. Source.
Aluminum Salts: It’s highly advisable to avoid deodorants with aluminum because it can clog your lymph nodes. It’s also linked to breast cancer.
Scarriest Chemical: Polyethylene Oxide (or Polyethylene Glycol or PEG)
Manufacturers claim this is non-toxic, and yet official warnings say it is not to be used in cosmetics. Regardless, polyethylene glycol is commonly used in cosmetics, despite often being contaminated with ethylene oxide and 1,4-dioxane.

This should not be used in hair removal, either.

The polyethylene glycol mentioned above is often contaminated with carcinogens. They are also known to cause irritation on the broken skin, which improper shaving can lead to.

Polyethylene glycol also increases your skin’s permeability even more than hot water, meaning you absorb more of the ingredients in your shaving cream or razor than you would otherwise.

Healthy Alternatives to Strips
Lubricating strips are a great idea, one that I have come to appreciate a lot over the years. Here are some tips for keeping your skin soft and irritation-free without exposing it to potentially harmful substances and chemicals:

Exfoliate
Before shaving, use a natural sugar or salt scrub to sluff off dead skin. This keeps your razor sharper longer because it’s not picking up as much extra gunk. This, in turn, prevents razor burn and other uncomfortable side effects of shaving.
— http://www.barenaturalhealth.com/razors-link-organ-toxicity-cancer/

Hundreds of Kids' Cosmetics Products May Contain Hidden Carcinogen

More than 200 personal care products marketed to children and babies may contain 1,4-dioxane, a common contaminant that is a likely carcinogen.

More than 8,000 personal care products in EWG’s Skin Deep® cosmetics database include ingredients produced through ethoxylation, including polyethylene, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and ceteareth. Of those, more than 200 are marketed to children and infants, EWG found.

Although 1,4-dioxane is not intentionally added to personal care products, ethoxylated chemicals can contaminate personal care products with trace amounts of 1,4-dioxane. Some companies voluntarily remove or reduce 1,4-dioxane from these products through a process called vacuum stripping. Currently, the Food and Drug Administration has no rules that require companies to do so.

The Environmental Protection Agency has classified 1,4-dioxane as a likely human carcinogen and it is listed in California’s registry of chemicals known to cause cancer. In laboratory studies, animals who drank water with 1,4-dioxane developed tumors in the liver, nasal cavity, and the peritoneal and mammary glands. Short-term exposure to relatively high amounts of 1,4-dioxane is particularly damaging to the liver and kidneys.

Because manufacturers don’t have to disclose the presence of 1,4-dioxane on product labels, there’s no way for consumers to know if their personal care or other household products harbor the hidden carcinogen. Among the products marketed for use on children and babies that may contain 1,4-dioxane are popular sunscreens, toothpastes, bubble baths and shampoos.

Bipartisan legislation introduced by Sens. Diane Feinstein, D-Calif., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, would give the FDA the power to review dangerous chemicals like 1, 4-dioxane. The bill would also require personal care companies to alert the agency when their products injure consumers, and would give the FDA the power to recall dangerous products.
— http://www.ewg.org/enviroblog/2017/07/hundreds-kids-cosmetics-products-may-contain-hidden-carcinogen

Center for Environmental Health Releases Official List Of Shampoos That Cause Cancer

Good evening. Check your showers for any of these shampoos!


It seems like every day that a new study is released showing a correlation between our daily household goods and cancer causing ingredients. The use of carcinogenic ingredients in manufacturing is on the rise, and they are finding their way into our homes in unexpected places.

When you read this story about the latest detection of cancer-causing ingredients in something you use every day, you will have to tell all your friends.

A study on soaps and shampoos conducted by the Center for Environmental Health, based in Oakland, California, discovered that your shampoo could be deadly. In fact, the study concluded that 98 of the included products contained a potential carcinogen called cocamide diethanolamine (cocamide DEA). California listed cocamide DEA as a known carcinogen in 2012 under its Prop 65 law, which requires warning labels on consumer products containing carcinogens or reproductive toxicants.

Michael Green, the executive director of CEH, stated that, “Most people believe that products sold in major stores are tested for safety, but consumers need to know that they could be doused with a cancer-causing chemical every time they shower or shampoo. We expect companies to take swift action to end this unnecessary risk to our children’s and families’ health.”
— http://awm.com/center-for-environmental-health-releases-official-list-of-shampoos-that-cause-cancer-4/?utm_medium=partners&utm_source=kitchenfun